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Immigration in South America


Immigrants of South America
Immigrants of South America

Most of the South American countries gained independence in the early 19th century, thus bringing an end to the legal exclusion of foreigners. Mass immigration to the continent, however, did not begin until after 1850, acquiring momentum in the last three decades of the century and continuing until 1930, when it decreased abruptly. Some 11 to 12 million people arrived in South America; the great majority of these went to Argentina (more than half) and Brazil (more than one-third). Although many later left, the demographic and sociocultural impact of this influx was tremendous in Argentina, Uruguay, and (to a lesser extent) in southern Brazil. Immigration to other countries was numerically insignificant (although socioculturally meaningful), except in Uruguay, where because the preexisting population was not numerous, the proportion of foreign-born was high—about one-fifth in 1908 and even higher in the 19th century. In Argentina the proportion of foreign-born reached nearly one-third of the total population and stayed at that level for many years. In both cases the contribution of post-independence immigration was proportionally much higher than in the United States at the peak of mass immigration.

Europeans—Italians


The great majority of the immigrants were Europeans—Italians (forming nearly half of the immigrants in Argentina, one-third of those in Brazil, and probably the majority of immigrants in Uruguay), the Spaniards (one-third in Argentina), and the Portuguese (nearly one-third in Brazil).

Other small but socially relevant immigrant streams arrived from central and eastern Europe. This source of immigration became more important in the 20th century and especially during the 1930s and ’40s, when it included more middle-class and educated people, among whom were many Jews and other refugees. After World War II another smaller wave of immigration arrived from Europe (principally from Italy and Spain), directed mostly to Venezuela and Argentina. Other immigrant groups arrived from East and South Asia and from the Middle East. Chinese labourers came in the 19th century to help build South American railways and established Chinese districts in such cities as Lima.

Labourers from South Asia were brought by the British to Guyana, and similar migrants came to Suriname, supplemented by workers from the East Indies (Indonesia). Lebanese migrated to South America from the Ottoman Empire prior to World War I; known locally (and incorrectly) as “Turks” (turcos), these Lebanese became important in commerce and even politics in such cities as Guayaquil, Ecuador. Since World War II, Koreans have migrated to Argentina (under a negotiated treaty) and under less formal conditions to countries as diverse as Paraguay and Ecuador, where they often have become involved in commerce and industry. The largest Asian group by far, however, has been the Japanese. Before World War II large numbers of Japanese settled in Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, and Argentina. People of Japanese ancestry now are found primarily in the Brazilian states of São Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul, as well as in Argentina and Peru; collectively they constitute the largest concentration of ethnic Japanese residing outside of Japan. "South America" © Emmanuel BUCHOT, Encarta, Wikipedia

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