Photographic book

Michigan in the 1970s - 1980s


Michigan capitol state
Michigan capitol state

The 1970s and 1980s were a period of crises for Michigan. Detroit still suffered from the aftermath of the race riots in 1967 and its crime rate increased. Detroit and other cities were ordered by federal courts to desegregate their schools, but whites resisted programs to bus children to achieve racial balance. Urban automobile plants and their suppliers began to relocate both in suburban areas and other states, leading to more unemployment, neighborhood deterioration, and crime. Conditions worsened when Middle Eastern oil suppliers imposed an embargo on the United States in 1973, causing gasoline shortages and a decline in car sales. This temporarily crippled Michigan’s two largest industries, automobile manufacturing and tourism.

Coleman Young was elected in 1973 as Detroit’s first black mayor, and the start of construction on a hotel and business complex named the Renaissance Center and the Joe Louis Arena helped revitalize the downtown area. After a brief rebound, the economy faltered again in the 1980s. Because its economic base was so heavily dependent on the auto industry, Michigan once more was hit hard when automobile sales slumped, as many consumers chose foreign cars over American models. The state’s third leading industry, agriculture, also declined, and unemployment in the state reached its highest level since the Great Depression. Two governors held office during this turbulent period. William G. Milliken became governor in 1969 when Romney resigned to join President Richard Nixon’s cabinet. Milliken was in office 13 years, making him the state’s longest serving chief executive.

In 1983 James Blanchard became the first Democratic governor of Michigan in 20 years. Like Milliken, Blanchard emphasized education and economic stability. He proposed a plan to diversify the economy, retraining workers for high technology jobs, and sought regional cooperation among the Great Lakes states to attract new industries. However, his ideas received little support from the legislature and business leaders.

In 1973 Gerald R. Ford, a Michigan congressman, was appointed vice president of the United States after the incumbent, Spiro Agnew, resigned. The next year, Ford became the 38th president when Nixon resigned because of the Watergate political scandal.

The 1970s also saw conflicts between the state and Native American residents. A 1979 federal court decision upheld the rights of Michigan tribes to fish and hunt in traditional areas. "Michigan" © Emmanuel BUCHOT, Encarta, Wikipedia

Photos of European countries to visit

Photos Czech Republic

Czech Republic

Photos Informations

Hungary Pictures

Hungary Pictures

Photos Informations

Spain photos

Spain photos

Photos Informations

Scotland Photos

Scotland Photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Portugal

Portugal

Photos Informations

Photos England

Photos England

Photos Informations

Pictures Amsterdam

Netherlands

Photos Informations

Photos of Asian countries to visit

India photos

India photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Photos Informations

Images from South Korea

South Korea

Photos Informations

Cambodia photos

Cambodia

Photos Informations

Photos of Japon

Photos of Japon

Photos Informations

Photos of Thailand

Photos of Thailand

Photos Informations

Photos of Taiwan

Photos of Taiwan

Photos Informations

Photos of America

Website information