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Hawaii and the Union


President Lyndon Johnson
President Lyndon Johnson

Hawaii entered the Union with only one member in the U.S. House of Representatives, but gained a second representative after reapportionment based on the 1960 national census. In 1962 Quinn was succeeded as governor by Burns, a Democrat, who was reelected in 1966 and 1970. Democrats held the office continuously from then through 1996. In 1974 George R. Ariyoshi became the first Japanese American governor of the state.

After 1959 tourism greatly expanded as a result of the widespread publicity attending statehood and the introduction of jet airline service to the islands. The construction industry prospered with the increased demand for hotel space and other tourist facilities. As investments and visitors from Japan poured into the islands, tourism generated jobs and a higher standard of living for Hawaii’s fast-growing population.

Industries in Hawaii


In addition to tourism, efforts were made to spur industrial development and diversification and to expand overseas trade. Hawaii’s economic development reached a milestone in 1965 when a foreign trade zone was established at Honolulu. The zone permits goods to be imported and processed for reexporting to foreign countries without becoming subject to U.S. customs. Agriculture continued to decline in importance, while the military remained a significant economic factor. By 1980, one out of every seven people living in the islands was a military employee or dependent.

Development itself continued to be a major issue in the politics of the state.

How to accommodate the tourist boom and other economic growth while preserving the islands’ natural beauty posed one of the state’s major challenges, as high-rise hotels and condominiums crowded scenic areas and automobile traffic created congestion and air pollution.

Yet Hawaii remained one of the most beautiful populated areas of the world. International education in Hawaii has grown as a minor industry. The University of Hawaii expanded tremendously in the years immediately following statehood, setting up satellite campuses on the outer islands and adding a medical and law school to the main campus on Oahu. Creation of the East-West Center by President Lyndon Johnson and the Congress led some to see Hawaii’s economic future in the selling and buying of skills and knowledge in the world, especially Pacific, markets. Independent planning and engineering consultants, architects, and others associated with the development of tourism in the Pacific made Hawaii their base. By the 1990s more than 200 island firms took an active role in Pacific trade, and many mainland corporations established Pacific regional headquarters in Honolulu. "Hawaii" © Emmanuel BUCHOT, Encarta, Wikipedia

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