Photographic book

Vermont at the end of the 20th century


Photo of Vermont
Photo of Vermont

The demand for Vermont’s industrial products, especially machine tools and precision instruments produced in Windsor and Springfield, increased during World War II (1939-1945). However, the difficulty of obtaining some restricted raw materials slowed production and prevented industrial growth. After the war, industry grew steadily, although most businesses remained small. In the 1950s and 1960s, national firms bought small Vermont concerns to gain special patents or processes, and several large industrial companies, including International Business Machines (IBM), opened new factories in the state. The recreation industry, which had its roots in the 1840s and revived under state government sponsorship during the 1930s, became a chief source of income after World War II.

Stowe and other ski resorts in the Green Mountains became popular year-round recreation destinations. In addition to recreational opportunities, “heritage tourism” has expanded, focusing on artistic, cultural, and historic attractions. The growth of tourism has at times conflicted with the state’s strong environmental protection laws, which safeguard natural and cultural resources and promote community and regional planning.

Transportation remained inadequate, not only for the state’s own population and industries but also for tourists. No new railroads were built after the beginning of the century, and railroad passenger service proved unprofitable. In addition, there was not enough traffic from Vermont’s scattered towns to warrant extensive air service.

Motor travel was hindered by the legislature’s reluctance to spend state money or to accept federal aid to build roads. Finally, in the late 1950s, a modern highway system was begun, culminating in the opening of two interstate highways in 1969 and 1970.

Vermont’s strong environmental movement, which dates back to the 1960s, has been instrumental in the passage of various pollution and land control regulations. Billboards disappeared from Vermont highways in the mid-1960s. A sweeping land use law, Act 250, passed by the legislature in 1970, was one of the nation’s strictest development laws. It requires housing developments and ski resorts to meet ten environmental criteria. Vermont’s Clean Air Act levied a tax on new automobiles that get low gas mileage.

Vermont’s population has grown steadily since the 1960s, with many new residents coming from New York and Massachusetts. The rise in computer-related industries, information technology, services, tourism, and small manufacturing and business have characterized much of the economic growth. At the same time, agriculture has declined in importance, and many farms have been sold and converted to homes and recreational land. Many Vermont farmers, manufacturers, craft workers, and businesses now look for and supply regional, national, and international markets with specialty foods and products. "Vermont" © Emmanuel BUCHOT, Encarta, Wikipedia.

Photos of European countries to visit

Photos Czech Republic

Czech Republic

Photos Informations

Hungary Pictures

Hungary Pictures

Photos Informations

Spain photos

Spain photos

Photos Informations

Scotland Photos

Scotland Photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Portugal

Portugal

Photos Informations

Photos England

Photos England

Photos Informations

Pictures Amsterdam

Netherlands

Photos Informations

Photos of Asian countries to visit

India photos

India photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Photos Informations

Images from South Korea

South Korea

Photos Informations

Cambodia photos

Cambodia

Photos Informations

Photos of Japon

Photos of Japon

Photos Informations

Photos of Thailand

Photos of Thailand

Photos Informations

Photos of Taiwan

Photos of Taiwan

Photos Informations

Photos of America

Website information