Photographic book

A universal declaration


French food picture
French food picture

Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, revolutionary manifesto adopted on August 26, 1789, by the National Assembly of France and attached as the preamble to the new constitution of 1791. It was written principally by Abbé (later Count) Emmanuel Sieyès. The declaration enumerated a number of rights with which “all men” were held to be endowed and that were described as inalienable.

In effect, this revolutionary pronouncement nullified the divine right of kings to rule, which was the age-old basis of French government. These inalienable rights included participation, through chosen representatives, in the making of laws; equality of all persons before the law; equitable taxation; protection against loss of property through arbitrary action by the state; freedom of religion, speech, and the press; and protection against arbitrary arrest and punishment.

Historians are divided in their opinions on the political origins of the declaration. Some see in its revolutionary pronouncements the influence of the U.S. Declaration of Independence and the bills of rights of a number of state constitutions in the United States. Others trace the ideas embodied in the declaration to English principles of democratic rights. Still others interpret its strong emphasis on individual rights as an expression of the Calvinistic doctrine of freedom of conscience.

A large body of opinion holds that the declaration was a product of the current of ideas known as the Age of Enlightenment and expounded by the French philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau in his Social Contract. Marxists regard it as a statement of the basic principles of the revolutions that brought feudalism to an end and established the capitalist system of society. The declaration had great influence on political thought and institutions. It was a model for most of the declarations of political and civil rights adopted by European states in the 19th century and for the bill of rights of the constitution of the Weimar Republic of Germany (1919-33). "France" © Emmanuel BUCHOT, Encarta, Wikipedia

Photos of European countries to visit

Photos Czech Republic

Czech Republic

Photos Informations

Hungary Pictures

Hungary Pictures

Photos Informations

Spain photos

Spain photos

Photos Informations

Scotland Photos

Scotland Photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Portugal

Portugal

Photos Informations

Photos England

Photos England

Photos Informations

Pictures Amsterdam

Netherlands

Photos Informations

Photos of Asian countries to visit

India photos

India photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Photos Informations

Images from South Korea

South Korea

Photos Informations

Cambodia photos

Cambodia

Photos Informations

Photos of Japon

Photos of Japon

Photos Informations

Photos of Thailand

Photos of Thailand

Photos Informations

Photos of Taiwan

Photos of Taiwan

Photos Informations

Photos of America

Website information