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Temperatures and rainfall in Australia


Australia is the arid continent. Over two-thirds of its landmass, precipitation (largely as rainfall) per annum averages less than 20 inches (500 mm), and over one-third of it is less than 10 inches (250 mm). Little more than one-tenth of the continent receives more than 40 inches (1,000 mm) per year. As has been noted, in winter the snowfields of Tasmania and the Mount Kosciusko area can be extensive, but on the whole Australia is an extremely hot country, in consequence of which evaporation losses are high and the effectiveness of the rainfall received is reduced. In addition, the severity of climate, the predominance of the outdoors in the minds and lives of many, and the national importance of agricultural and pastoral pursuits all make Australians perhaps more climate-conscious than most. In no country of comparable development do climate and weather loom so large in the lives and conversation of the people.

Australia climate


Australian climate map
Australian climate map

The principal features of Australia’s climate stem from its position, shape, and size. Australia is mainly a compact tropical and near-tropical continent. No major arms or embayments of the sea penetrate far into the landmass. The only extensive uplands occur near the east coast, and even they are not, by world standards, very high. In summer (December–February), when the sun is directly overhead in northern Australia, temperatures are extremely high. The sea exerts little moderating influence, and the uplands are not sufficiently extensive or high to have more than local effects. Temperatures commonly soar above the 100 °F (38 °C) mark in the interior, but because there rarely is any cloud cover, radiation loss is considerable at night, and daily temperature ranges are wide. High temperatures dominate the Australian summers in all but Tasmania.

Heat waves are common, and, though the highest amounts of solar radiation are received in northern South Australia, the highest temperatures and longest heat waves are recorded in the northwest of Western Australia. For example, Marble Bar has recorded a maximum temperature of 100 °F or more on 162 consecutive days. Temperatures in winter remain moderate except in the uplands of Tasmania and southeastern Australia, where snow is common. Night frosts are common in winter throughout southern Australia and in the interior. Because of its relatively low latitudinal position, Australia comes under the influence of the southeast trade winds in the north and the westerlies in the south. Northern Australia is affected by a northerly monsoon, partly because of the latitude and the seasonal migration of planetary wind zones and partly because of the summer heating of the continental interior that draws in surface winds. The monsoon brings summer (December–February) rains to the northern coastal area that penetrate inland for variable distances. These summer rains are all the more important because most of northern Australia is in the sheltered rain shadow of the Eastern Uplands, which block the rain-bearing southeast trades in winter. The trades, forced to rise by the uplands, bring heavy rains to the Pacific coasts of Queensland and northern New South Wales. These areas are also affected by tropical cyclones and receive the heaviest rains of any part of Australia. Within this coastal fringe, the northern Queensland area around Tully, south of Cairns, is the wettest, with an annual average of nearly 160 inches (4,050 mm).

Southern Australia


Southern Australia receives winter rains from depressions associated with the west-wind zone. Again, there are local topographic controls, with uplands receiving higher amounts than the adjacent plains. Parts of the southern Mount Lofty Range, in South Australia, average more than 40 inches (1,000 mm) of rainfall per year, but Adelaide, to the west, averages only about 20 inches (500 mm), while the Murray plains, in the rain shadows of the range, receive 15 inches (380 mm) or less rainfall annually. In the great mass of the interior of Australia, annual rainfall averages less than 20 inches (500 mm), and over vast areas the total is less than 10 inches (250 mm); the Lake Eyre region averages less than half that amount. Rainfall in these areas is unreliable and capricious, with long droughts broken by damaging rains and floods. Over Australia as a whole, rainfall is indeed extremely variable. Only in the far north, around Darwin, in the southwest of Western Australia, in southern South Australia and Victoria, in Tasmania, and in eastern New South Wales is the recorded annual precipitation fairly consistent, in any given year totaling no more than 10 percent above or below the long-term average in specific years. "Australia" © Emmanuel BUCHOT, Encarta, Wikipedia

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