Photographic book

The society of Alaska at the beginning of the 20th century


Tanana Valley
Tanana Valley

As Alaska’s population grew to 63,592 in 1900, the federal government sought to encourage agriculture. As early as 1897, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had sent three agents to various regions in Alaska to examine their suitability for agriculture. Acting on the agents’ recommendations, the department established several agricultural experiment stations, first at Sitka in 1898, then at Kenai, Kodiak, Rampart, Copper Center, Fairbanks, and finally Matanuska in 1917.

Alaska also needed a transportation system, but road building did not begin until passage of the Nelson Act and the creation of the Board of Road Commissioners in 1905. The Nelson Act created the Alaska Fund, decreeing that 70 percent of all money collected from license fees outside of incorporated towns was to be used for road building. Another 25 percent went for education, and the remaining 5 percent for care of the insane.

Since the Nelson Fund did not accumulate enough money, Congress annually appropriated additional road construction funds. By 1920 the Alaska Road Commission, as the board came to be called, had built 7,870 km (4,890 mi) of roads and trails.

The United States elected Democrat Woodrow Wilson as president in 1912. He promised to give Alaska’s problems the utmost consideration. Among other items, he recommended that Congress aid in unlocking Alaska’s resources by constructing a railroad.

Railroad


Congress authorized the construction of the Alaska Railroad in 1914 and appropriated $35 million; construction began in 1915. The line was to run from Seward to Fairbanks. The project was finished in 1923 at a cost of about $65 million. Anchorage, now Alaska’s largest city, owes its origin to the railroad. It began as construction headquarters for the Alaska Engineering Commission in charge of railroad construction. The commission built Anchorage, installing water, electrical, sewage, and telephone facilities. It put in streets and provided firefighting services as well as a hospital and a school for children of its employees. The railroad construction brought an economic boom, employing more than 2,000 workers in 1914 and rising to a high of 4,500."USA" © Emmanuel BUCHOT, Encarta, Wikipedia

Photos of European countries to visit

Photos Czech Republic

Czech Republic

Photos Informations

Hungary Pictures

Hungary Pictures

Photos Informations

Spain photos

Spain photos

Photos Informations

Scotland Photos

Scotland Photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Portugal

Portugal

Photos Informations

Photos England

Photos England

Photos Informations

Pictures Amsterdam

Netherlands

Photos Informations

Photos of Asian countries to visit

India photos

India photos

Photos Informations

Photos of Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Photos Informations

Images from South Korea

South Korea

Photos Informations

Cambodia photos

Cambodia

Photos Informations

Photos of Japon

Photos of Japon

Photos Informations

Photos of Thailand

Photos of Thailand

Photos Informations

Photos of Taiwan

Photos of Taiwan

Photos Informations

Photos of America

Website information